Suggest a New National Treasure Today
Save the past. Enrich the future.

Help us identify endangered places of national significance for our revolving portfolio of National Treasures. National Treasures are places where the National Trust’s on-the-ground assistance can have positive implications for preservation nationwide.

To be selected as a National Treasure, historic resources must meet three key criteria:

1. The resource must be nationally significant, or the work involved in its preservation must have national implications.

   •To be considered nationally significant, places may be a designated National Historic Landmark, be listed on or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places at the national level of significance, or have another designation that indicates a national level of historic significance.

   •To have national implications, a successful outcome addressing the threat will set a precedent or serve as a national model to help save or protect other comparable historic resources across the country.

2. The resource must be threatened. Threats endangering a historic resource can include demolition, closure, neglect, inappropriate development, insufficient protection or a lack of funding.

3. There must be a clear role for the National Trust in making a significant difference to save or protect the endangered resource. The role for the National Trust can include providing targeted technical assistance in advocacy, marketing, planning, legal assistance, development, heritage tourism, Main Street or other areas of preservation related expertise.

To suggest an endangered place for consideration as a National Treasure, please complete the online application below. You may fill out and submit an application at any time.

 Potential Treasure – Online Application

We will acknowledge receipt of each application and the applicant will be notified when the National Trust has made a conclusive decision. Questions regarding the application process may be directed to nominations@savingplaces.org.

Please note this is a very competitive national program with a rigorous selection process that includes several levels of review. It can take several months before a final decision is made to add a new National Treasure to the portfolio. Additionally, because the National Trust dedicates a team of representatives from across the organization to work on the specific threat facing each National Treasure, only a limited number of campaigns can be carried out at any given time.

Thank you for your interest in the National Treasures program.

Quick Fact

10,000

In 2013, more than 10,000 people took action online to help save America’s National Treasures.

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Help These Places Today

  • Photo by Ron Cogswell
  • Floating by Miami Marine Stadium, an entertainment venue off the Biscayne Bay. | Photo: Rick Bravo
  • The Battle Mountain Sanitarium was established by Congress in 1902. | Photo: National Trust
  • Antiguo Acueducto del Rio Piedras. Courtesy of Para la Naturaleza
  • Photo by Amy E. McGovern
  • New York Studio School in New York City. Courtesy New York Studio School, 2009/Photo by Daniel Gerdes
  • Courtesy Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation
  • Photo by Alison King
  • Cliff Dwelling at sunset in Eastern Cedar Mesa. Photo by Donald J. Rommes
  • Photo by Carol Highsmith
  • Union Terminal. Courtesy Cincinnati Museum Center
  • Courtesy James River Association
  • Photo by Donna L. Ching
  • Photo by Burger International Photography
  • Villa Lewaro is the home of Madam CJ Walker. | Courtesy Historic New England/ Photo by David Bohl
  • Philip Johnson designed the Pavilion for the 1964-65 World’s Fair. | Photo: Duncan Kendall
  • Administration Building | Photo by Cynthia Lynn
  • Patayan-style rock art at Sears Point Area of Critical Environmental Concern. Photo by Robert Mark
  • Photo courtesy Franz Neumeier/www.steamboats.org
  • Save the Dome
  • Photo by James Higgins
  • The Mississippi Delta has been referred to as the "cradle of American culture." | Photo: National Trust
  • Sunset at Willamette Falls, the largest waterfall in the Pacific Northwest. | Photo: Brian Rockwell
  • The electrical substation at Hanford, WA, a Manhattan Project site. | Photo: National Trust
  • Union Station serves as a historic gateway to the Nation's Capital. | Photo: Carol Highsmith
  • The Milwaukee Soldiers Home was built in 1867. | Photo: Milwaukee Preservation Alliance
  • Pond Farm was the home/studio of prominent ceramicist Marguerite Wildenhain. | Photo: National Trust
  • Hinchliffe Stadium was built by public funds during the Great Depression. | Photo: Melissa Murphy
  • Photo by Gordon Beall
  • The Rosenwald Program improved education for African Americans in the South. | Photo: National Trust
  • Mount Taylor sits atop one of the richest reserves of uranium ore in the U.S. | Photo: National Trust
  • Lyndhurst is a site of the National Trust. | Photo: Brian Thomson/The Ethan James Foundation
  • The stone walls and moat of Fort Monroe. | Photo: Patrick McKay
  • The number of cruise ships in Charleston has increased exponentially. | Photo: National Trust
  • Auburn Avenue is a historically significant African American commercial area. | Photo: Stan Kaady
  • It was here that Joe Frazier trained for his victorious bout against Muhammad Ali. | Photo: Pete Marovich
  • Village of Zoar | Photo by Andy Donaldson
  • Princeton Battlefield is one of the Revolutionary War’s most significant battlefields. | Photo: Jon Roemer
  • Theodore Roosevelt first came to North Dakota in 1883 to hunt buffalo. | Photo: Dickinson State University
  • The Karnes County Courthouse in Karnes City. | Photo: Mick Watson
  • Malcolm X—Ella Little-Collins House | Photo by Steve Dunwell
  • La Jolla, CA Post Office
  • Ellis Island was known as an “Island of Hope” for immigrants. | Photo: Clara Daly/ward9.com
  • Success! Chimney Rock designated a National Monument. | Photo: Mark Roper, U.S. Forest Service
  • The Haas-Lilienthal House is an exuberant 1886 Queen Anne-style Victorian. | Photo: Jeff Scott
  • The Washington National Cathedral was completed over the course of 83 years. | Photo: National Trust
  • Nantucket Lightship is the largest U.S. lightship ever built. | Photo: Matt Teuten
  • Terminal Island played a vital role during WWI and WWII. | Photo: Los Angeles Harbor Department
  • White Grass is one of America's last, great pioneer dude ranches. | Photo: National Trust
  • Stoneman Bridge | Photo by Lee Rentz
  • Prentice Women’s Hospital opened to international acclaim in 1975. | Photo: Landmarks Illinois